Storm Drain #4

About this painting:

Let’s make like frogs, and hop to it!

This design concept is by Kelsey Kirkendall, and it has become a town favorite! Water Lilies (Nymphaeaceae), more commonly known as Lily Pads are a family of flowering plants (The Editors of Encyclopaedia Brittanica, 2016).

Water Lilies are commonly associated with frogs, mainly because many frogs do indeed, hop from lily to lily while catching prey; frogs also find resting atop lily pads comfortable.

But YOU can rest later! Play a game or two of hopscotch while counting the numbers as you go. RIBBIT-RIBBIT.

Artists involved with this painting include: Katherine Barr, Jessica Blaze, Jenna Bragg, Anna Cone, Cambria Godsey, Kelsey Kirkendall, Katlyn Knuver, Katie Morrisroe, Brittany Salazar, Lauren Scavo, Gabriel Shennum, and Chantel Shetler (painting).

References

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Brittanica. Water Lilly. 2016. The Encyclopaedia Brittanica. Web. http://www.britannica.com/plant/water-lily.

Artist's reflections:

"We painted bright, colorful murals that will hopefully make people aware of how important it is to keep storm drains clean. Our goal was to change people’s behavior by focusing on the positive outcome of keeping our lakes and streams clean. We also featured a lot of examples of local wildlife and plants to show people what they are protecting by not polluting the water.

I know that for me personally, before I started this project, I didn’t even notice storm drains. I also believed that they went through some sort of filtration process before water was dumped back in the lake, and that organic matter such as grass and leaves weren’t harmful. Now I know that this isn’t true. I think that this is a very important message to get out to communities that have a lot of natural water resources... It is easy to take these lakes for granted and assume that they will always be there. However, if they aren’t protected, they will eventually become disgusting and the community will suffer as a result. I think this project is a way to get people involved in a way that doesn’t isolate them with a bunch of numbers or statistics.

I think it would be fun to get a project like this started in my hometown of Lima, Ohio. We don’t have as many lakes as Warsaw does, but we still have several important rivers that flow through the city. I also think it would help to bring people pride in their city--- something that isn’t usually associated with Lima.

I think that this project has really taught me the importance of caring for the environment. I have never really considered myself to be an environmentalist; I do recycle a little and I try not to litter but it has never really gone beyond that. This project has showed me the importance of doing my part right where I am at..."

-Kelsey Kirkendall

Artist's reflections:

"[This] is a project to inform the community about what is going into their lakes and streams. If the community does not know [about their lakes and streams], then they can’t change. They can’t change because they don’t know that they are doing anything wrong. If they know then they can help; they can make a difference. ...We started to learn about the impact we have, as people, on the environment without even knowing it! I felt like I was helping in a small way when I saw the paintings come to life and the questions people had while [I was] doing it. I definitely think that it is an experience like none other..."

-Jessica Blaze